GEOGRAPHY

Pitcairn Island is of volcanic origin, although it is long extinct.  Unlike the other three islands of the group, Pitcairn is a volcanic peak rather than a coral atoll/plateau.  There is an abundance of vegetation on Pitcairn, as well as fertile soil.  All around the island are high cliffs and unforgiving, rocky coastline.  There is only one proper harbor at Bounty Bay, although there have been talks of an alternative harbor in Western Harbour.

The maps below show a general view of Pitcairn, and an inset of Adamstown.  Please note that these maps are slightly outdated as new houses have since been built and others torn down.  Click to enlarge.

                                       

Pitcairn's rocky coastline, two pictures which capture the feel of Pitcairn Islands's coast.
       

Pitcairn measures roughly 3.2 kilometers long by 1.6 kilometers wide (2 by 1 mile).  It is roughly 4,100 miles south-west of Panama, and 3,300 miles north-east of Auckland, New Zealand.  The only settlement is called Adamstown, although there are people who live outside of the town.  There is a mostly-sealed main road going through the town, but there are many unsealed ones besides this.

Looking down on Adamstown from Gannets Ridge.


The only current useable harbour in Bounty Bay.
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